13 December, 2018

15. Let There Be Light and the Heavy Ion Collider


15. Let There Be Light and the Heavy Ion Collider



"Let there be light..."
—Gen 1:3

With those four words, Eternity Past fades into obscurity, and the Anno Mundi* (Latin for In the Year of the World) Epoch begins.

Years ago, I saw a bumper sticker that read: I believe in the Big Bang. God said it, and BANG it happened. I always liked that because I felt it helped bridge the so-called gap between science and religion.

Why "so-called"?

Since the ASA believes science = natural laws and forces only, it is an oxymoron to be a scientist who believes in both natural and supernatural forces.

By the ASA's own definition, the scientific method must be observable and repeatable. Thus, ASA scientists denounce Creation scientists and deem Creation Science a pseudoscience, and any adherents are ignorant and absurd, if not downright idiotic, because they resolve "to describe natural history in terms of scientifically untestable supernatural causes.

Think about that.

If something is not observable, repeatable, and testable, it's not science.

Do we observe something coming from nothing?

Can we test something coming from nothing?

Can we repeat something come from nothing?

The long answer? No.

Thus, by default, ASA Cosmology is just as much a pseudoscience as Creation Science.

Creation scientists didn't observe God create the world.

ASA scientists didn't observe a random explosion called the Big Bang.

Neither group of scientists can repeat the creation of a universe.

So just for a moment, let's discard the "observable, repeatable, and testable" method when it comes to cosmology...this is where the Ion Collider comes in. (I know, I'm having a geekfest here, but this is really cool!) The Heavy Ion Collider is the largest machine in the world; it is contained in a circular tunnel, with a circumference of 17 miles, at a depth ranging from 164 to 574 ft underground.


According to a ridiculously convoluted and nearly unpronounceable paper written by ASA scientists and published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the conditions of the early universe were biased toward creating something out of nothing, because "for every 10 billion anti-particles, there were 10 billion particles — plus one." The plus one, they've dubbed the “God particle” which "allows for the existence of pretty much everything else in the universe."

That still doesn't explain where the 10 billion particles from from, but we'll ignore that.

When particles and anti-particles collide, they create a flash of light (hmmm), and with the "God-particle" such a collision caused the universe to come into being.


CERN physicists collided heavy ions to free quarks, recreating (repeating) hypothetical conditions that existed in the universe just after the Big Bang. For the sake of argument, let's say the only difference between the popping into existence of the universe at the Big Bang and the popping into existence at the command "Let there be light" is the random chance of the primordial Hadron ion collider button depressing by itself vs God hit the primordial Hadron ion collider button.

The science is the same whether you are a ASA or Creationist scientist. It's just a matter of First Cause: God, or the 10 billionth and one (10,000,000,001) particle.


So how did I incorporate an ion collision into Creation week in CoT?  The above gif and the first post photo above inspired the idea of the Prince jumping into the matrix (ionized by the Holy Spirit's hovering over the face of the deep). And in the video above (@ 0:12 seconds), the ions collide with the Prince at the very moment God says, "Let there be light."  


*Anno Mundi was the original calendar era before BC / Before Christ and AD  / Anno Domini (Latin for In the Year of our Lord), which is slowly being replaced by the ASA's BCE / Before the Common Era and CE / Common Era. Based on the biblical accounts of the creation of the world and subsequent history, Anno Mundi was used by the Eastern churches (Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, etc) all the way through 1728, and is used by the Jewish people to this day. The Western Church (Catholics and by-default Protestants) never embraced it. They instead used the Anno Domini (in the Year of our Lord) devised in 525, though it was not widely used until after 800. (In CoT, Anno Mundi is the dating used by Gavriel in his reports and summary logs).

Photo Credit:  Matthieu Pangea © Used with Permission. / GIF Photobucket:Shareware / Ion Collider

Washington Post: Scientists may have solved mystery of matter’s origin

Physical Review Letters: Postinflationary Higgs Relaxation and the Origin of Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry Alexander Kusenko, Lauren Pearce, and Louis Yang Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 061302 – Published 11 February 2015
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